LifeAid System Tradgedy

May 2nd, 2012

Though senior and medical alert systems such as LifeAid are God-sends for the elderly and others with medical conditions wishing to live independently, there are also some risks that one wouldn’t otherwise consider. A case in point, is a tragic incident that occurred on November 19, 2011 in White Plains, NY. Kenneth Chamberlain, Sr. a heart patient living alone with a LifeAid medical alert system accidentally triggered the system alarm via the pendant that he wore around his neck while sleeping. Though false alarms with medical alert systems are not uncommon events, what unfortunately must be pointed out here is that Mr. Chamberlain was an African American male living in a public housing project.

If we pause to consider the ramifications of Mr. Chamberlain’s circumstances based on the troubled history of encounters between African Americans and law enforcement, then we can possibly share the very same apprehension that Mr. Chamberlain experienced when the policed knocked on his apartment door in the middle of the night after being called by the LifeAid monitoring center.

The details of what transpired next are truly both infuriating as well as heartbreaking. Suffice it to say, that when the police left, Mr. Chamberlain lay dead on the floor of his apartment and the police officers involved were exonerated of any wrong doing in his death, which unfortunately seems to be the norm for many of these types of encounters. You can read the full story of what happened on Workers World.

Medical Alert Systems for Seniors

January 27th, 2012

With advances in technology there are a wide variety of emergency alert systems, but the one that is getting the most attention is medical alert systems for seniors. You can find a wealth of alarm systems for things like intruder alerts, fire and smoke detectors alarms, CO, and also for many medical conditions such as diabetes, epilepsy, and children and adults with special needs. However, with a rapidly growing elderly population and the desire to remain independent as long as possible, the demand for senior alert systems will only continue to grow.

As people age, their perceptions and physical strength begin to decline. This is simply the inevitable effects of living a long life. Rather than lament what we can no longer do in our senior years, it’s much more productive to begin developing coping strategies for getting the highest degree of quality from those “Golden Years.” For many seniors this means not becoming a burden to their children by being forced to move in with them and their children or being forced off to a nursing home. Instead, many seniors welcome the opportunity to continue living in the familiar surroundings of their own homes.

In order to achieve this independence, a coping strategy that can overcome the fear or being in distress while all alone must be acquired. Perhaps a better term is a “support” strategy or support system needs to be put in place to help with overcoming this very real fear. More like a safety net if you will.

Senior Alert Systems Benefits

January 26th, 2012

A constant among all human beings is the desire for freedom and dignity and as we’ll see, these are also senior alert systems benefits. What most senior citizens desire beyond seeing that their loved ones are prosperous and healthy is that they themselves do not become an emotional or financial burden on their loved ones. The best way for them to achieve this goal is for them to remain independent in their own homes.

What often occurs is that a spouse will die and effectively leave a senior to live alone. Even as a couple, many seniors would be in a difficult situation if a spouse were to experience a fall or a medical emergency. Determining the severity of the situation and knowing whom to contact can sometimes be challenging and confusing for the elderly. This many times causes seniors to reluctantly resign themselves to being moved to assisted living arrangements often well before they are ready or truly require such arrangements.

What examined more closely, the limiting factors that prevent many otherwise capable seniors from living alone and unassisted is fear and a general lack of confidence among themselves and their loved ones. What is Mom should slip in the kitchen and not be able to get to a phone or what would Dad do if he was experiencing chest pains and couldn’t call 911? All of these fears are quite justified; however, they don’t need to be the end of independent living for many seniors.